10 Ways You Can Incorporate Healthier Fruit To Your Meals

fruitsEating more vegetables and fruits as part of their healthy lifestyle is likely to reduce risk of some chronic diseases. Fruits provide nutrients vital for health such as potassium, dietary fiber, vitamin C, and folic acid. Most fruits are low in fat, sodium, and calories and none have cholesterol and can be fresh, frozen, dried, whole, cut, pureed or canned. Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the Fruit Group.

Here are 10 simple tips to fit more fruits into your healthy lifestyle:

1. Keep visible reminders – keep a bowl of whole fruit on the table, counter, or in the refrigerator.

2. Think about taste – buy fresh fruits in season when they may be less expensive and at their peak flavor. Add fruits to sweeten a recipe.

3. Think about variety – buy fruit that are dried, frozen and drain canned (in water or 100% juice) as well as fresh, so that you always have a supply on hand.

4. Don’t forget the fiber – make most of your choices whole or cut fruit rather than juice, for the benefits that dietary fiber provides.

5. Be a good role model – set a good example for children by eating fruit every day with meals or as a snack.

6. Include fruit as breakfast – at breakfast top your cereal with ½ banana, peaches, or strawberries; add blueberries, 100% juice.

7. Try fruit at lunch – at lunch pack a tangerine, banana, or grapes to eat or choose fruit from a salad bar. Individual containers of fruit like peaches or applesauce are easy and convenient.

8. Experiment with fruit at dinner as well – at dinner add a small amount of crushed pineapple to coleslaw or include orange sections, dried cranberries, or grapes in a tossed salad.

9. Snack on fruit – dried fruit make great snacks and they are easy to carry and store well.

10. Keep fruit safe – rinse fruit before preparing or eating them. Under clean, fresh water rinse fruit, even if organic is used to remove dirt and surface microorganisms. After rinsing you may place in a strainer to air dry.

Have you had a chance to read all of our past articles, this week has been all about nutrition, if not you can read them here.

Do you need help with creating a healthier lifestyle? If so, contact me today!

Mavis Kelley, CHHC, AADP is a Certified Integrative Health and Wellness Life Coach specializing in nutrition, health, well-being, and lifestyle design. For more information or to schedule a breakthrough session, please contact her at: Mavis@nspirehealthyliving.net or visit her website at: http://NspireHealthyLiving.com.

Advertisements

10 Tips to Reduce or Eliminate Sodium

sodium01Do you add salt to everything that you cook and eat? Most of us do but it plays a key part in high blood pressure and everyone should reduce their sodium intake down to about 1 teaspoon of salt a day or supplement with fresh herbs. Adults, 31 and older, African Americans of any age, and individuals with high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease should eliminate their sodium intake.

Here are 10 tips to reduce or eliminate sodium:

1. Think fresh – A lot of sodium eaten is found in processed foods; cheesy foods, cured meats such as bacon, sausage, hot dogs, and deli meats, ready-to-eat foods such as canned chili, ravioli and soups. Stick with fresh foods that are generally lower in sodium. Additionally, fresh herbs, lemon or limes can be used as well.

2. Enjoy home cooked foods – cook more often at home and stay in control of what your food is prepared with this will help to eliminate any unnecessary amount of salt.

3. Fill up on vegetables and fruits – fresh or frozen they are naturally low in sodium.

4. There are a variety of proteins with which to choose that are low in sodium. For instance soy takes on the flavor that you add such as herbs, lemon, mushrooms and ginger can all take the place of sodium.

5. Adjust your taste buds – reduce your salt intake gradually and pay attention to the natural tastes of various foods. This will help your taste for salt to lessen over time.

6. Skip the salt – skip adding salt when cooking, keep salt off the kitchen counter and the dinner table. Use spices, herbs, garlic, vinegar, or lemon juice to season foods. You can even try black or red pepper, basil, curry, ginger, or rosemary.
7. Read the label – it is important to read the nutrition facts label and the ingredients to find packaged and canned foods lower in sodium. Look for foods labeled with “low sodium”, “reduced sodium”, or “no salt added”. It is always best to purchase fresh instead of canned items.

8. Ask for low-sodium foods when you eat out – restaurants may prepare lower sodium foods at your request and will serve sauces and salad dressings on the side so you can use less.

9. Pay attention to condiments – if you like soy sauce, ketchup, pickles, olives, salad dressings, and seasoning packets then you are probably eating a high amount of sodium. Choose low-sodium soy sauce and ketchup if you must. Eat carrot and celery sticks instead of olives or pickles.

10. Boost your potassium intake – choose foods with potassium, which may help to lower your blood pressure. Potassium is found in vegetables and fruits such as potatoes, beet greens, tomato juice and sauce, sweet potatoes, beans (white, lima, kidney), and bananas. Some other sources of potassium include yogurt, clams, halibut, orange juice, and milk.

Do you need help with your healthy lifestyle design? If so, contact me today!

Click here to read more of my articles. Visit my website today for more information about nutrition, here.

Mavis Kelley, CHHC, AADP is a Certified Integrative Health and Wellness Life Coach specializing in nutrition, health, well-being, fitness and lifestyle design. For more information or to schedule a breakthrough session, please contact her at: Mavis@nspirehealthyliving.net or visit her website at: http://NspireHealthyLiving.com.